AFRICOM [United States Africa Command]

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Re: AFRICOM [United States Africa Command]

Message par malikos » 06 décembre 2018, 23:43



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Re: AFRICOM [United States Africa Command]

Message par malikos » 07 décembre 2018, 00:08

US military in Africa for exploitation, Middle East control: Analyst
Thu Dec 6, 2018 11:23AM [Updated: Thu Dec 6, 2018 12:28PM ]
HomeUSInterviews
James Petras, political analyst

James Petras, political analyst
The United States military is expanding its presence in Africa in order to exploit the continent’s oil and resources, while keeping an eye on the Middle East region, an American analyst says.

James Petras, a political analyst in New York, made the remarks while discussing a 2018 briefing by the US African Command (AFRICOM) that shows Washington runs 34 bases across Africa, contrary to the Pentagon’s insistence that it maintains a modest presence across the continent.

The 2018 briefing by AFRICOM’s science adviser Peter E. Teil, titled Strategic Posture, was exposed by The Intercept in early December.

In the briefing, Teil presented a map of the US military’s constellation of the bases, which names 14 forward operating sites (FOSes) and cooperative security locations (CSLs) besides providing country-specific locales for 20 contingency locations.

“The second area is military-strategic interests and using military bases as a way to maintain political dominance,” Petras told Press TV on Wednesday.


PressTV-Vast network of US military bases in Africa exposed
A US military briefing shows Washington is running 34 bases across Africa, contrary to the Pentagon’s claims of a modest military presence.
The military forces that Washington has deployed to various African countries would prevent popular uprisings in areas that the US is seeking its own interests, the analyst added.

The presence also helps Washington to keep supporting Saudi Arabia and Israel in the Middle East, Petras argued, an advantage that the US might end up using against Iran as well.

“So there is a connection here between us military bases in Africa with the US military bases in the Middle East targeting countries which refuse to comply or submit to the US, including Iran, Iraq and Syria,” he said.

“The facts of the matter are, that contrary to Washington’s propaganda, Africa has become part of the US attempt to establish world hegemony and beyond regional influence as a springboard towards the Middle east and beyond,” he concluded.


https://www.presstv.com/Detail/2018/12/ ... com-report


malikos
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Re: AFRICOM [United States Africa Command]

Message par malikos » 10 décembre 2018, 23:18

that type of project is good and would be required 100 fold more than any base....make another 100 of those :super:
Aïr-Info Agadez
6 novembre ·
Agadez : cérémonie de réception d'un puits muni de pompe solaire à tassakintalamt

Ce puits moderne équipé d'une pompe solaire fait suite à une demande formulée par la population de tassakintalamt, village situé à quelques kilomètres de la ville d'Agadez à l'endroit de la base aérienne 201. Sa réalisation a coûté 20.000$ US et vise à étancher " la soif de nos populations et même de notre bétail " a reconnu M. Bazo, chef du village de Tassakintalamt.
La réception a eu lieu hier matin en présence des autorités régionales qui n'ont pas manqué de saluer cet acte combien important pour les populations de Tassakintalamt.
Pour montrer leur volonté d'aider la région, les pensionnaires de la base aérienne 201 organisent souvent des expositions-ventes de produits locaux au cours desquelles les artisans font des grands bénéfices.
Rappelons enfin que la base aérienne 201 a dans un récent passé apporté plusieurs appuis aux jeunes et aux femmes de la commune d'Agadez. Sans oublier des appuis en tables bancs et autres équipements aux écoles d'Agadez.

La Rédaction

L’image contient peut-être : une personne ou plus, personnes debout, enfant et plein air
L’image contient peut-être : une personne ou plus, personnes debout et plein air
L’image contient peut-être : 2 personnes, personnes souriantes, personnes debout
L’image contient peut-être : une personne ou plus, personnes debout, enfant et plein air
L’image contient peut-être : 1 personne, debout, ciel et plein air
+2
19 commentaires37 partages
9393
J’aime


malikos
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Re: AFRICOM [United States Africa Command]

Message par malikos » 16 décembre 2018, 17:49

A series of mixed messages from the famous John Bolton, but clearly aligned with "America first" strategy.
That will only deter african nations from cooperation with US, which is good from my point of view.
US Africa strategy hinges on local forces stepping up as Pentagon ramps down: Bolton
By: Joe Gould   2 days ago

National security adviser John Bolton unveils the Trump administration's Africa Strategy at the Heritage Foundation in Washington, Thursday, Dec. 13, 2018. (Cliff Owen/AP)
WASHINGTON — As the Trump administration pulls back America’s military presence in Africa, it’s calling for more African regional security organizations to step up, U.S. national security adviser John Bolton said Thursday.

In a speech at the Heritage Foundation, a conservative think tank, Bolton unveiled the administration’s strategy to counter the rapidly expanding financial and political influence of China and Russia across Africa and work through allies to curb radical Islamic terrorism.

Overall, Bolton also sought to contrast America’s straight-forward approach — to “help African nations take control of their economic destinies and their own security needs” — with China’s “predatory” investments in local infrastructure projects.

“China uses bribes, opaque agreements, and the strategic use of debt to hold states in Africa captive to Beijing’s wishes and demands,” Bolton said. “Its investment ventures are riddled with corruption, and do not meet the same environmental or ethical standards as U.S. development projects.”

On the military front, China opened its first overseas military base last year in the Horn of Africa nation of Djibouti, the site of the only permanent U.S. military base on the continent. Bolton warned of a possible shift of the strategic region, along the lucrative and busy Red Sea shipping lane, to China.

But the plans to develop U.S. economic ties and protect the independence of African countries comes as the U.S. military will cut 10 percent of its 7,200 forces deployed in Africa. America hopes to foster African self-reliance, Bolton said.

“What we’d like to do is empower the African countries to do more security, to do it more of their own security, to do it in coordination with one another — they’re the ones who know the neighborhood — rather than have the deployment of American forces who are comparatively very well paid and well equipped,” Bolton said.

Bolton also emphasized the potential of the G5 Sahel Joint Force, a band of 5,000 troops comprised of Mauritania, Niger, Chad, Burkina Faso, and Mali — formed to counter militants linked to al-Qaeda and Islamic State in the Sahel.

The U.S. almost doubled its pledge of financial support for the force that began deploying last year to fight a surge in Islamist militant attacks, Bloomberg reported last month. Assistance was set to jump to $111 million, from an initial pledge of $60 million made in October 2017.

But the G5 Joint Force, according to the United Nations, is suffering from “equipment shortfalls, capability gaps, insufficient infrastructure and a lack of secured operational bases [that] continue to delay its full operationalization.”

U.S. special operations forces in Central and West Africa have been focused on training up African host-nation forces to combat growing insurgencies from Islamist militants. But the military is ramping down on the continent, following a national report that the U.S. military lacks the global resources to meet China or Russia in a potential future conflict.

“Our goal is for the nations of the region to take ownership over peace and security in their own neighborhood,” Bolton said.

“Under our new strategy, we will also take several additional steps to help our African friends fight terrorism and strengthen the rule of law,” Bolton said. “We will assist key African governments in building the capacity of partner forces and security institutions to provide effective and sustainable security and law enforcement services to their citizens.”

That said, Bolton expressed support for the idea of moving U.S. Africa Command headquarters to Africa from Germany, where it’s been since its founding in 2007. “I think the Pentagon has been clear that it ought to be in the theater it’s responsible for,” he said.

Bolton said the U.S. wants to see more regional cooperative security organizations like the G5 Sahel Joint Force emerge around the world.

As the force seeking to build regional capability to combat terrorism, transnational organized crime, and human trafficking in the Sahel, “G5 countries must remain in the driver’s seat—this initiative cannot be outsourced to the U.N. for funding and other support.”

Bolton, who has long denounced the United Nations, said the U.S. will a reevaluate its support for U.N. peacekeeping missions — only supporting those it deems “effective and efficient.” He blasted the peace-keeping operation in the Western Sahara for lasting 27 years.

“All too often at the United Nations, establishing the peace-keeping force and deploying it is the end of creative thinking,” he said. “There needs to be a lot more focus on resolving the conflict. Success is not simply continuing the mission ad infinitum."

The Associated Press contributed to this report.
https://www.defensenews.com/congress/20 ... wn-bolton/


malikos
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Re: AFRICOM [United States Africa Command]

Message par malikos » 16 décembre 2018, 17:51

I posted the prior statement with "america first" and then watched the video afterwards....I am smiling :lol:
Guys you are so goooood.


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Re: AFRICOM [United States Africa Command]

Message par zeitrecht » 16 décembre 2018, 21:09

malikos a écrit :
16 décembre 2018, 17:51
I posted the prior statement with "america first" and then watched the video afterwards....I am smiling :lol:
Guys you are so goooood.
Bolton est tellement sincére que je vais écraser une larme sur le sort des pays Africains qui se font exploiter honteusement par les Chinois et Russes.

Bullshit


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Re: AFRICOM [United States Africa Command]

Message par malikos » 16 décembre 2018, 21:39

Oui j aimer ça aussi. Comme si c’est une faveur que les pays occidentaux exploit les pays africains...mais la coopération avec les chinois est mauvaise....


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Re: AFRICOM [United States Africa Command]

Message par zeitrecht » 18 décembre 2018, 20:18

malikos a écrit :
16 décembre 2018, 21:39
Oui j aimer ça aussi. Comme si c’est une faveur que les pays occidentaux exploit les pays africains...mais la coopération avec les chinois est mauvaise....
Eh oui,l'arrogance de certains pays occidentaux n'a pas de limites.Par le passé ils ont apporté la civilisation aux pays qu'ils ont colonisés :D


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Re: AFRICOM [United States Africa Command]

Message par malikos » 18 décembre 2018, 20:59

zeitrecht a écrit :
18 décembre 2018, 20:18
malikos a écrit :
16 décembre 2018, 21:39
Oui j aimer ça aussi. Comme si c’est une faveur que les pays occidentaux exploit les pays africains...mais la coopération avec les chinois est mauvaise....
Eh oui,l'arrogance de certains pays occidentaux n'a pas de limites.Par le passé ils ont apporté la civilisation aux pays qu'ils ont colonisés :D

"Civilisation" implique en quelque sort dans un contexte colonial, une vue hiérarchique dénigrent l’indigène sauvage et la destruction de son mode de vie/culture.
Tout à fait contraire aux déclarations du droit d’homme de 48, mais malgré ça Le-Pen et les pieds noir veulent toujours glorifier l’épochè coloniale.
Allah yehdehoum...


malikos
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Re: AFRICOM [United States Africa Command]

Message par malikos » 18 décembre 2018, 22:11

even more drones, one day we will arrive at the ratio of one US drone per African.
Military Capabilities
US building new hangars at Djibouti UAV base
Jeremy Binnie, London - Jane's Defence Weekly
18 December 2018

The US has awarded a contract to build new hangars at Chabelley Airfield in Djibouti, according to a notice published on the US Federal Business Opportunities (FBO) website on 13 December.

The contract covers the construction of four semi-permanent aircraft maintenance hangars to replace temporary large-area maintenance shelters (LAMSs) at Chabelley, from where US Air Force Reaper and Predator unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) have flown since 2013.

The partially redacted notice was released to justify the non-competitive contract award on the basis that there was only one company that could provide the required services.

The contract was awarded to the Italian company Consorzio Stabile GMG SCARL in April because the company is already conducting work at Chabelley.

Want to read more? For analysis on this article and access to all our insight content, please enquire about our subscription options at ihsmarkit.com/janes

https://www.janes.com/article/85300/us- ... i-uav-base


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Re: AFRICOM [United States Africa Command]

Message par malikos » 19 décembre 2018, 20:27



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Re: AFRICOM [United States Africa Command]

Message par malikos » 01 janvier 2019, 20:35

435th Air Expeditionary Wing Public Affairs
Subscribe 5
Not all heroes wear capes, but one hero deployed to Nigerien Air Base 201, Agadez, Niger, does wear two uniforms. At home, U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Jacob Lappin is a member of the New York City Fire Department, and abroad, he serves as a civil affairs Soldier.
https://www.dvidshub.net/video/652815/m ... o-graphics


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Re: AFRICOM [United States Africa Command]

Message par malikos » 20 avril 2019, 20:53



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Re: AFRICOM [United States Africa Command]

Message par malikos » 22 avril 2019, 08:19

freedom of speech, as long it is oppertun.
That is Waldhausers "different" "truthful" and "honest" approach when it comes to "gain confidence"in Africa.
Shut the opposing voices down...what an example for "lived and real" ???democracy=???...sarcasm off
No Need To Whisper, AFRICOM Isn’t Listening In
by Nick Turse and Tom Engelhardt Posted on April 22, 2019
Originally posted at TomDispatch.

What is it about the U.S. military and TomDispatch? Last August, I discovered (thanks to a correspondent in that military) that the Pentagon’s computer networks had blocked this website. (The message you received if you tried to get to it: “You have attempted to access a blocked website. Access to this website has been blocked for operational reasons by the DOD Enterprise-Level Protection System.”) And the reason/category for blocking it: “hate and racism.” As I wrote at the time, I could after a fashion understand why our work might fall under that rubric: “TomDispatch has always hated America’s never-ending, ever-spreading, refugee- and terror-producing wars that now extend from South Asia across the Middle East and deep into Africa.” And I added, “Among the authors who have spread TomDispatch’s antiwar gospel of hatred – now so judiciously cut off by the Pentagon – Nick Turse, in particular, has long grimly tracked the growth and spread of Washington’s forever wars and of the Special Operations forces, the semi-secret military that has become, in these years, their heart and soul.”

Little did I know how accurate I was, however. Today, TomDispatch regular and Managing Editor Nick Turse explains how he personally got “eliminated” from the attention of AFRICOM, the command he’s covered so assiduously for years in a way that its personnel evidently didn’t find quite flattering enough. In fact, it could be said that when it comes to criticism of American wars, this website has been eerily on target since it began in 2002. And it’s true that if you had read any of our pieces on American war making from 2004 to 2010, 2011 to the piece I posted last week, you might have felt a certain need to stop a moment and think twice about the “forever” that’s been embedded in this country’s twenty-first-century wars since they were first launched in October 2001. And that, of course, would have created obvious problems for a military intent on fighting its “infinite” conflicts to essentially the end of time.

Under the circumstances, if I had been U.S. Africa Command, which now officially plans, for example, to be in Somalia at least until 2026 (and I’m sure that no one at AFRICOM thinks of that as a real end date either), I might have “eliminated” Turse, too. But for those of you still capable of checking him out, here’s a blow-by-blow account of his adventures in AFRICOM-land. ~ Tom

AFRICOM Calls for My "Elimination" (From Their Daily Media Reports)
By Nick Turse

If a tree falls in the forest and no one is around to hear it, does it make a sound? Or to bring this thought experiment into the modern age – if it happens in the forest, does it stay in the forest? I ask this question because it has a bearing on the article to come. Specifically, what if an article of mine on the U.S. military appears somewhere in our media world and that military refuses to notice? Does it have an impact?

Before I explain, I need to shout a little: AFRICOM! AFRICOM! AFRICOM!

Any media monitoring service working for U.S. Africa Command, the umbrella organization for American military activity on the African continent, would obviously notice that outburst and provide a “clip” of this article to the command.

But just to be safe: AFRICOM! AFRICOM! AFRICOM!

Now, there is no excuse for this article not to appear in AFRICOM’S clips, which are packaged up and provided to the Africa Command’s media relations office in Stuttgart-Moehringen, Germany, on weekdays as the “AFRICOM Daily News Review.” In fact, including Africa Command or its acronym 11 times in the first 200 words of this piece must be some kind of record, the sort that should certainly earn this article the top spot in tomorrow’s review.

But no matter how often I mention AFRICOM’s name, I know perfectly well that’s not going to happen. Let me explain.

The “Elimination” of “Tom’s Dispatch”

“Like every organization that has a role in the public sphere, it is important to maintain awareness of events, incidents, and the atmospherics in order to participate tactically and strategically in the ongoing discussion,” AFRICOM’s present chief spokesman, John Manley, told me when I asked about the command’s media-tracking efforts. “We need to monitor events occurring in our AOR [area of responsibility], which is one of the most dynamic and complex regions on Earth, in order to provide the most appropriate and effective counsel for leaders to make informed decisions.”

Who could argue with that? And yet documents I obtained from AFRICOM via the Freedom of Information Act indicate that the command may never know this article even exists, even though it’s already mentioned AFRICOM 15 times.

How could that be? As a start, don’t blame some project manager at the Fairfax, Virginia-based ECS Federal, LLC (now ECS), a military contractor and “leading provider of solutions in science, engineering, and advanced technologies” hired to monitor the media and provide the command with news clips. Presumably, that person had been conscientiously taking your tax dollars in exchange for checking what outlets like the New York Times, the Washington Post, and TomDispatch had to say about AFRICOM – until, that is, U.S. Africa Command put an end to it.

Yours truly has been writing about the command for TomDispatch since 2012, as well as for The Intercept, Vice News, and Yahoo News, among other outlets. I’ve exposed a “secret war” in Libya involving more than 550 U.S. drone strikes and reported on a network of African outposts integral to such warfare. I’ve written several pieces on AFRICOM’s even larger network of outposts across the continent. I’ve covered killings and torture by U.S.-backed local forces on a drone base in Cameroon frequented by American military personnel, as well as cold-blooded executions committed by those same Cameroonian forces. I’ve written on the expansion of a drone outpost in the Horn of Africa and its role in lethal strikes against the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria; on the construction of a $100-million drone base in Niger and its quarter-billion-dollar operating costs (as well as skepticism about “U.S. intentions in the region”); on a previously unreported outpost in Mali; on a hushed-up Pentagon Inspector General’s investigation into failures in the planning and carrying out of humanitarian projects; on U.S. missions in Niger, including an October 2017 ambush that killed four American soldiers; on the increasing number of U.S. special-ops missions across Africa; on special-ops activities and outposts in Libya; on a surge in the number of special-ops personnel continent-wide, as well as an even more impressive increase in the number of U.S. military activities there – and that’s just for a start.

By September 15, 2017, I had already written more than 20 pieces about U.S. military activity in Africa for TomDispatch and had – just days before – revealed at the Intercept that the National Security Agency (NSA) had built a network of eavesdropping outposts in Ethiopia. AFRICOM had clearly had enough of me. At 8:10 that morning, someone at the command’s media relations office fired off an email whose subject line was, ominously enough: “Elimination of Author/Sources.” As it happened though, that act proved to have more in common with the proverbial ostrich than a drone strike. The note was, if you’ll excuse the pun, terse. It read:

The following outlets should not be included in news clips:

The Intercept

Tom’s Dispatch

Reporter’s not to include:

Nick Turse.

Thanks.


A September 2017 email from the AFRICOM Media Relations Office calling for the “elimination” of Nick Turse and “Tom’s Dispatch.”
Leaving aside that there’s no publication called “Tom’s Dispatch,” the redacted email to a program manager at ECS Federal made it clear that someone at the Africa Command’s media shop preferred not to know what I was writing about AFRICOM.

This backroom blackballing (about which I then knew nothing) would burst into the open when spokesperson Robin Mack started hanging up on me if I called the press office for information. Not long after, Lieutenant Commander Anthony Falvo, then head of AFRICOM’s public affairs branch, told me bluntly that the command was no longer going to respond to my questions. Any of them. “We don’t consider you a legitimate journalist, really,” he said and then hung up on me.

At the time that directive was written, AFRICOM’s media monitoring efforts were supposedly brand new. “The requirement began in August 2017 and was being refined over the next few months in 2017 to ensure the product met the needs of the command,” AFRICOM’s John Manley would explain once we were all talking again and I asked why I had been blacklisted. “The stories included in the ‘AFRICOM Daily News Review’ generally come from mainstream media and African local/regional press,” he added. “Because of the volume of published reports in mainstream media, we don’t typically include bloggers and others who write for niche websites and publications.”

His response left me curious, since once upon a time someone at least was looking at my pieces there. After all, a year before I was axed, an email from an AFRICOM media relations officer to fellow spokesperson Samantha Reho referenced a TomDispatch piece of mine, indicating that it was “not going in the clips.” So, in August 2016, there was evidently previous media monitoring and TomDispatch was apparently already being excluded.

AFRICOM’s anti-blog bias also seems strange for a command that once ran its own blog. Similarly, it’s odd that the Intercept was considered an unworthy niche publication when AFRICOM often provides comment to that very same outlet. Wouldn’t the command at least be interested in how its statements were being used?

Admittedly, TomDispatch has long billed itself as a “regular antidote to the mainstream media,” which may have especially rankled AFRICOM due to that command’s clear pro-mainstream bias and history of bestowing most-favored-journalist status on marquee cable news and television network journalists. I know this because in October 2017, while attempting to hang up on me, AFRICOM press office personnel accidentally put me on speakerphone, allowing me to listen in on closed-door conversations in their office for roughly an hour.

During that time, while they repeatedly ignored my calls (made from a separate line) or unceremoniously hung up on me, I listened in as they entered into embargo agreements with TV reporters, providing information on background to journalists willing to withhold news about Sergeant La David Johnson, one of the soldiers killed in an ambush in Niger that month. Such arrangements are common enough and entirely understandable when lives may be at stake. Still, I was struck by how well reporters who agreed to play ball with the press office were treated.

Of course, AFRICOM also does include “African local/regional press” outlets like Mareeg.com (an “independent news website” focused on Somalia) in its clips, but this evidently isn’t a hard-and-fast rule – at least if I’m even tangentially involved. As one ECS Federal employee wrote, “Attached is the daily media monitoring report for Thursday, 21 September 2017. Please note that we left out this piece from a Somali outlet Mareeg that was critical of AFRICOM and U.S. activities in East Africa since it was based off Nick Turse’s recent article in The Intercept” – one focused on leaked top-secret NSA documents on U.S. electronic surveillance efforts in Ethiopia.

“That’s right,” replied a contact in AFRICOM’s public affairs office, “please omit any Intercept articles, or articles based on Nick Turse’s ‘stories.’” (I must admit that I get a kick out of those scare quotes around “stories”!)

Finally, to confuse things further, I learned that AFRICOM also maintains a double standard regarding my reporting. While my articles from the Intercept and TomDispatch are verboten, those from Vice News are not. “We are aware of your stories that appear in major news organizations (i.e., your VICE story of Dec 12, 2018). Those are included,” Manley wrote me about an article on the U.S. conducting more named military operations and activities in Africa than in the Middle East. “The VICE story appeared in the December 13, 2018 edition of the Daily Media Summary. I might add it was the first story in the Executive Summary, which highlights the five or six most impactful stories of the day.”

It’s unclear, however, why its impact was significantly greater than those articles that got me banned from AFRICOM’s Daily News Review. (An impact in and of itself.) Like dozens of pieces before it, the reporting in that article laid bare much that the command had long kept secret, including that U.S. forces have suffered casualties in Cameroon, Chad, Kenya, Mali, Nigeria, Somalia, and Tunisia in recent years, in addition to those high-profile deaths in Niger in 2017.

Undercover Articles

Since AFRICOM generally avoids my pieces from “niche” outlets, I assume that the command has no idea that I spent an hour listening in on their press office’s mundane conversations, off-color jokes, and screaming fits back in 2017. I published that story (strike one!) at The Intercept (strike two!) just months after AFRICOM formally excised articles of mine from their daily news clips (strike three!). The command may also not know that, about a month later, another Intercept article of mine was accompanied by an audio clip of their then-media chief, Anthony Falvo, deeming me an illegitimate journalist. Then again, the first time that John Manley, AFRICOM’s current press chief, took a call from me, he asked if we were on the record and if I was recording our conversation. So perhaps word had somehow gotten to him.

Suffice it to say that AFRICOM’s press office and I are, for the moment, back on speaking terms and Manley has, in fact, been the very model of a modern military press officer: courteous, responsive, and – under the extreme limitations of his office – even helpful. It’s been something of a sea change.

Naturally, then, I briefly wondered whether, after this piece was published at TomDispatch, his attitude toward my future queries might change. Would he stop taking my calls? Hang up on me? Ignore emailed requests for answers to basic questions? Or use any of the other tactics wielded by his predecessors?

Manley’s behavior, as I said, has been commendably professional, but I suddenly realized that I had nothing to worry about anyway – unless he’s suddenly started reading TomDispatch in his off-hours. As far as I know, this website remains on AFRICOM’s blacklist, which means that this article will never appear on their radar, much less in the executive summary of their Daily News Review. While the command will answer my questions, ignorance is apparently bliss when it comes to what I write (Vice News excepted), no matter what I reveal about, or how many times I mention, AFRICOM in an article. For now, what happens at TomDispatch stays at TomDispatch – at least when it comes to Africa Command.

Nick Turse is the managing editor of TomDispatch and a contributing writer for the Intercept. His latest book is Next Time They’ll Come to Count the Dead: War and Survival in South Sudan. His website is NickTurse.com.

Follow TomDispatch on Twitter and join us on Facebook. Check out the newest Dispatch Books, John Feffer’s new dystopian novel (the second in the Splinterlands series) Frostlands, Beverly Gologorsky’s novel Every Body Has a Story, and Tom Engelhardt’s A Nation Unmade by War, as well as Alfred McCoy’s In the Shadows of the American Century: The Rise and Decline of U.S. Global Power and John Dower’s The Violent American Century: War and Terror Since World War II.

Copyright 2019 Nick Turse

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malikos
Mulazim Awal (ملازم أول)
Mulazim Awal (ملازم أول)
Algeria
Messages : 1331
Inscription : 01 avril 2012, 13:54

Re: AFRICOM [United States Africa Command]

Message par malikos » 22 avril 2019, 22:12

imperisalism par excellence...Veni, vidi, vici...
“It’s important that we bring you here and you understand where we’re trying to go and how you all fit into that,said Marine Corps Gen. Thomas Waldhauser, commander, U.S. Africa Command.We want your activities to be complimentary [to ours]. You have the ability with your relationships and roles to foster long-term engagements.”

http://www.africom.mil/media-room/artic ... conference
...man go home. Nobody wants you here in Africa...by now you can grasp that guys...

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