Actualité militaire au Niger

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Re: Actualité militaire au Niger

Message par malikos » 02 décembre 2018, 18:12



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Re: Actualité militaire au Niger

Message par malikos » 02 décembre 2018, 18:37

And another tails number of a Hercules on the civilian part of Agadez airfield, with heavily armed US-soldiers guarding the unloading process.


Tail number: RS88604

Niger : base aérienne américaine à Agadez
0
BY FRÉDÉRIC POWELTON ON 28 NOVEMBRE 2018ANTI TERRORISME

Les Etats Unis d’Amérique vont achever la construction de leur base aérienne à Agadez avant 2024.
La localité de l’implantation de cette base est stratégique pour la surveillance des frontières des pays de la région ainsi que pour combattre les différents groupes terroristes.
Le coût de l’opération est estimé à plus de deux cent cinquante millions de dollars.
Le budget annuel de fonctionnement est évalué à plus de 30 millions de dollars.
Cette base nommée BA-201, abritera en premier lieu les drones armés MQ-9 Reaper. Ces drones seront opérationnels en 2019.

http://sahel-intelligence.com/12512-nig ... gadez.html

Quite revealing that they want to finish the construction before 2024, meaning another five years works are scheduled. What is the fucking scope of that work? Another Rammstein? Also to grasp that in a first instance, reapers will be based, an indication there is more to come.
Take 1 and 1 .... make it 2, otherwise said here is more to expect from that base. I presume since a very long time, due to its geostrategic placement, a major base for transport and logistics is planned, with of course fighters, drones etc....


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Re: Actualité militaire au Niger

Message par malikos » 10 décembre 2018, 22:15

Mattis Erupts Over Niger Inquiry and Army Revisits Who Is to Blame
Defense Secretary Jim Mattis was livid over decisions taken following an investigation into a 2017 ambush in Niger that killed four Americans on a Green Beret team.
Credit

Mark Wilson/Getty Images


Image
Defense Secretary Jim Mattis was livid over decisions taken following an investigation into a 2017 ambush in Niger that killed four Americans on a Green Beret team.CreditCreditMark Wilson/Getty Images
By Thomas Gibbons-Neff, Helene Cooper and Eric Schmitt
Dec. 7, 2018

270
WASHINGTON — Defense Secretary Jim Mattis was livid last month when he summoned top military officials to a video conference at the Pentagon to press them about an investigation into a 2017 ambush in Niger that killed four Americans on a Green Beret team. His anger, Pentagon officials said, came from seeing news reports that junior officers were being reprimanded for the botched Niger mission while the officers directly above them were not.

Days later, a senior officer who had largely escaped punishment was told he would be reprimanded. Another senior officer’s actions before and around the time of the mission were also under new scrutiny.

And this week, Capt. Michael Perozeni, a more junior officer who had received much of the public blame for the mission received word from the Army: His reprimand was rescinded.

The turnaround is evidence of the troubled search for accountability in an incident that left a small team of underequipped and poorly supported American soldiers in the African scrub to be overrun by fighters loyal to the Islamic State. More than a year after the ambush — the American military’s largest loss of life in Africa since the 1993 “Black Hawk Down” debacle in Somalia — top military leaders continue to battle over how to apportion blame and who should be held accountable.

The Pentagon still has not issued a final summation laying out who bears responsibility for the events leading up to the ambush. An initial Defense Department investigation, begun 14 months ago and partially released in May, found widespread problems across all levels of the military counterterrorism operation, but focused in particular on the actions of junior officers leading up to the ambush.

Punishments are in legal limbo, as are, apparently, commendations for bravery. An unredacted version of the investigation, promised in May, has yet to be delivered.

And unlike two naval collisions last year in the Pacific that led within weeks to the removal of the commander of the Navy’s largest operational battle force, no top generals have been ushered out the door in the Niger case — an example officials say that Mr. Mattis has been quick to point out.

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Nigerien soldiers trained on the outskirts of the capital, Niamey. American Special Operations forces that partner with local allies have been criticized for risk-taking.
Credit
Finbarr O'Reilly for The New York Times


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Nigerien soldiers trained on the outskirts of the capital, Niamey. American Special Operations forces that partner with local allies have been criticized for risk-taking.CreditFinbarr O'Reilly for The New York Times
Cmdr. Candice Tresch, a Pentagon spokeswoman, said in a statement on Thursday that the Defense Department has “made improvements at all levels” after the ambush. But she offered no further details, citing the continuing investigation.

The slow pace of accountability has infuriated Mr. Mattis, who officials say is dissatisfied with the punishments given largely to junior officers. The reprimands were first reported by The Times after a longer Times investigation into the ambush. The only senior officer to receive a letter of reprimand so far is Maj. Gen. Marcus Hicks, the head of Special Operations forces in Africa, who was already planning to retire.

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The delays have led to recriminations within the military’s individual fiefs. Army Gen. Tony Thomas, the leader of Special Operations Command — which includes Green Berets, Navy SEALs and other American commandos around the world — has complained that his troops have been singled out for fault. He has also leveled criticism that Pentagon leaders are protecting United States Africa Command, which oversees missions across the continent.

In a memo to Mr. Mattis on Oct. 1, General Thomas blamed bad relations between Africa Command and the last commander of American commandos in Africa, Brig. Gen. Donald C. Bolduc, as one reason for the failed mission. The memo, obtained by The Times, said the internal tensions had “hindered the ability of commanders, at both levels, to understand, communicate, assess and mitigate risk as events transpired” in October 2017.

Animosity erupted during the video conference at the Pentagon last month between Mr. Mattis; Gen. Mark A. Milley, the Army chief of staff; Mark Esper, the Army secretary; Owen West, the military’s top civilian Special Operations policy official; and Paul C. Ney Jr., the Pentagon general counsel. General Thomas called in from his headquarters at MacDill Air Force Base in Tampa.

Mr. Mattis wasn’t the only one angry, Defense Department officials said. Army officials complained to aides that Mr. Mattis and Marine Gen. Joseph F. Dunford Jr., the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, had contributed to the morass by allowing Africa Command, whose leader, Gen. Thomas D. Waldhauser, is also a Marine, to essentially investigate itself by appointing General Waldhauser’s own chief of staff, Maj. Gen. Roger L. Cloutier Jr., to conduct the inquiry.

The blowback from the video conference was almost immediate. Maj. Gen. Edwin J. Deedrick Jr., the officer in charge of administering internal punishments, was quickly told by Army leaders to re-examine some of the reprimands from the investigation.

Included in the initial batch of reprimands was one for Captain Perozeni, the leader of the team in Niger that came under attack. Africa Command leaders singled out Captain Perozeni and another junior officer in the early public accounting of the ambush for having “mischaracterized” the mission in a preliminary planning document sent to superiors as a trip to meet with tribal leaders, not a counterterrorism effort.

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But in a classified version of the report, investigators found that Captain Perozeni had pushed back on orders to continue the mission as a capture-or-kill raid on a local militant. Captain Perozeni said he did not have the necessary equipment or intelligence and asked that the Green Beret team be allowed to return to base.

Troops in Hollywood, Fla., saluting the coffin of Sgt. La David Johnson, who was killed in the attack in Niger last year. The incident was the American military’s largest loss of life in Africa since 1993’s Black Hawk Down battle in Somalia.
Credit
Joe Raedle/Getty Images


Image

Troops in Hollywood, Fla., saluting the coffin of Sgt. La David Johnson, who was killed in the attack in Niger last year. The incident was the American military’s largest loss of life in Africa since 1993’s Black Hawk Down battle in Somalia.CreditJoe Raedle/Getty Images
Instead, a battalion commander based in Chad, Lt. Col. David Painter, ordered the team to continue. They did, and were attacked by dozens of Islamic State militants.

During the ambush, which lasted more than five hours, there were multiple acts of heroism, according to the May report and video from cameras mounted on the men’s helmets.

Captain Perozeni tried to hold together a unit that had communications problems, lightly armored vehicles and unreliable Nigerien forces as allies. At one point, Captain Perozeni was shot and thrown from the bed of his truck. Its driver, Sgt. First Class Brent Bartels, was shot in the arm but kept going. Wounded, he turned around and went back to get Captain Perozeni.

The initial reprimands, which also singled out other junior officers and enlisted men, skipped Colonel Painter and Col. Brad Moses, who was the commander of the Green Beret group in Western Africa at the time.

After the video conference at the Pentagon, General Deedrick informed Colonel Painter that he would be receiving a letter of reprimand. Colonel Moses, a rising star in the Special Operations community, has not been reprimanded, although officials said the Army is now taking a harder look at his actions.

Maj. Alan Van Saun, Captain Perozeni’s company commander, who was home on paternity leave during the ambush but had been reprimanded for what the investigation cited as insufficient training of his unit, this week received a permanent letter of reprimand — a document that essentially ended his career.

Although the investigation continues, General Thomas has decided to oversee the awards for Captain Perozeni’s team in what officials called an effort to set the record straight on the battle. In recent weeks General Thomas flew to Fort Bragg, N.C., the home of the Green Beret team, to ensure that the award citations were being prepared.

At Fort Bragg, General Thomas watched a video of the ambush made from images on the helmet camera of one of the dead soldiers. He read through the surviving soldiers’ statements about the battle.

And he asked whether Staff Sgt. Dustin Wright, who was killed trying to rescue a wounded comrade who eventually died, was eligible for the Medal of Honor, the military’s highest award. https://www.nytimes.com/2018/12/07/us/p ... attis.html


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Re: Actualité militaire au Niger

Message par malikos » 10 décembre 2018, 22:26

Zoom Afrique du 9 décembre 2018


Niger: Après le Mali, et le Burkina Faso, c'est maintenant au tour du Niger d'être en proie à des attaques terroristes du Boko Haram. C'est ce que laisse entendre le ministre nigérien de la Défense. Mais qui l'aurait cru: après le déploiement des bases françaises et des grandes bases américaines en connexion avec le Centcom US, le Niger aurait encore peur de Boko Haram. Toujours est-il que lors d'une intervention devant le Parlement, le ministre a rappelé «la situation préoccupante au Nigeria» voisin, où «des bases militaires ont été défaites récemment par Boko Haram. Les combattants de Boko Haram ont pu se ravitailler en matériel, ils ont pu se revigorer ». Sans le vouloir sans doute, le ministre nigérien décrit un processus désormais bien connu : une armée africaine attaquée par les terroristes qui s'arment pour attaquer une autre armée africaine, toutes deux placées sous protection occidentale.

Cameroun: le sénateur démocrate américain, Chris Van Hollen, a transmis samedi au secrétaire d'État américain, Mike Pompeo, une lettre signée par un groupe de sénateurs démocrates, faisant part de leurs vives inquiétudes au sujet des violations des droits de l'homme, des violations des règles de l'état de droit et de la fraude électorale au Cameroun. «Le Cameroun est devenu un partenaire régional de plus en plus important dans la lutte antiterroriste et les États-Unis ont renforcé leur engagement en matière d'assistance à la sécurité de ce pays ces dernières années. Cependant, la montée des tensions dans les régions anglophones du Nord-Ouest et du sud-ouest du Cameroun, conjuguée aux informations crédibles faisant état d'atteintes aux droits humains commises par les forces armées camerounaises dans ces régions et dans l'Extrême-Nord, où Boko Haram est actif, a changé la perception que l'on doit avoir de l'assistance militaire américaine », ont écrit les membres de la Chambre haute du parlement américain.

Les membres ont surtout fait allusion aux allégations qui faisaient la une des médias mainstream, à savoir le discrédit de l'armée camerounaise.

Mali: À quoi ressemble le Mali sous l'occupation ? Un peu comme à la France. De même qu’un état d’urgence a été instauré en France avant d'être institutionnalisé, un état qui risque d'être de retour depuis que les gilets jaunes manifestent, au Mali il y a aussi un état d'urgence décrété par le gouvernement pour éviter les manifestations. Mais le peuple camerounais descend quand même dans la rue pour protester contre les conditions dans lesquelles il est obligé de vivre pour satisfaire les multinationales et les gouvernements occidentaux, en un mot, les occupants.

Écoutons ensemble le témoignage des ouvriers de Rangold qui ressemble bizarrement aux complaintes des ouvriers français : Ce n'est pas moins de 2000 Maliens qui travaillent sur le site de la mine. Depuis le 5 décembre, les ouvriers sont tous en arrêt de travail. « Nous sommes déterminés à aller jusqu’au bout, assure un travailleur, malgré un message menaçant les travailleurs de licenciement, envoyé à tous, par la société. » https://www.presstv.com/DetailFr/2018/1 ... opulation-


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Re: Actualité militaire au Niger

Message par malikos » 10 décembre 2018, 22:27

seem to be very busy...but since there is a military hospital too, which Iearned today, this "nigerien" base is full of surprises.
Remark: I do not see armed personal...and less structures in background, compared to other publically available videos. Huray :super:
tail numer 5745
Dernière modification par malikos le 11 décembre 2018, 21:45, modifié 2 fois.


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Re: Actualité militaire au Niger

Message par malikos » 10 décembre 2018, 22:56

a white woman, a black american and a plastic snowman...in the middle of the desert. American way of life...we must send that to "saturday night".


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Re: Actualité militaire au Niger

Message par malikos » 10 décembre 2018, 23:29

tail number RS88601
Interesting details about the security measures in agadez, when the plane is vunerable on the ground.
(numbers, arms, vehicles, distribution, training etc)...would not show that, but ok their choice.
To note again armed US personal on the Nigerien-part of the base.


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Re: Actualité militaire au Niger

Message par malikos » 11 décembre 2018, 22:08

Yep...Africom learned a lot from the ambush. Sending now drunken green berets out, is better than.... :fou:
...I got it, that is the "to further refine our approach to countering violent extremists with our partners in the region", see article below. :sui:

One French servicemember dead, one American injured in Niger accident

By JOHN VANDIVER | STARS AND STRIPES Published: December 11, 2018

STUTTGART, Germany— The U.S. military is investigating a deadly accident involving U.S. and French troops in Niger that left one French servicemember dead and an American injured, U.S. Africa Command said Tuesday.

The U.S. servicemember was in stable condition after the Saturday vehicle accident, which was unrelated to any combat operation, AFRICOM spokesman Maj. Karl Wiest said.

“American military personnel provided on-site medical care to the French service member before medically evacuating him to Agadez for additional care,” Wiest said in a statement.

The New York Times, citing unnamed defense officials, reported that the driver—a Green Beret—may have been under the influence of alcohol at the time of the accident.

AFRICOM said the incident was under investigation and offered few details about the nature of the accident.

article continues below

“Our thoughts and prayers are with the family of the affected service member,” Wiest said. “There is an ongoing investigation into this incident. We will release more details as appropriate.”

The French servicemember died while undergoing treatment in Agadez, AFRICOM said. The American was evacuated to Europe for treatment, the command said.

The U.S. military operates at a base in Agadez, known as Niger Air Base 201. The site will eventually be a hub for operating drone flights, but work on the $100 million facility is not yet complete. The U.S. expects to be flying missions from the site in 2019, and there are several hundred U.S. personnel working at the facility.

During the past two years, the U.S. has quietly added troops in western Africa, and Niger has emerged as a main hub of operations. However, an ambush in October 2017 that left four U.S. soldiers dead, brought increased scrutiny to American military efforts in the region.

While the U.S. has been involved in counterterrorism missions in the area for years, the fact that U.S. special operations troops were in the line of fire in Niger took many in Washington by surprise.

In the fallout, several troops the Pentagon has issued several reprimands for planning and oversight failures connected to the missions. Maj. Gen. Marcus Hicks, head of U.S. Special Operations Command Africa, was the highest ranking officer to receive a reprimand.

Meanwhile, the Pentagon recently announced that it will reduce the number of troops operating out of western Africa as the military shifts its focus to China and Russia.

Still, AFRICOM says its mission in Niger and partnership with local forces is important for countering extremism.

“A safe, stable, secure and prosperous Africa is an enduring United States interest,” Wiest said. “The U.S. military provides training and security assistance to the Nigerien Armed Forces, including support for intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance to facilitate their efforts to target violent extremist organizations in the region.”

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Twitter: @john_vandiver https://www.stripes.com/news/africa/one ... t-1.560236
Dernière modification par malikos le 11 décembre 2018, 22:12, modifié 1 fois.


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Re: Actualité militaire au Niger

Message par malikos » 11 décembre 2018, 22:11

Army rescinds reprimand for Niger ambush that left four dead, report says

A soldier with the 3rd Special Forces Group uses rock drills to explain small unit tactics to Senegalese soldiers during a training exercise earlier this year in Niger. Since the 2017 ambush the killed four U.S. soldiers in the country, the U.S. military has struggled to reach consensus on which leaders should be blamed for poor mission planning.

KULANI LAKANARIA/U.S. ARMY



By JOHN VANDIVER | STARS AND STRIPES Published: December 10, 2018

The Army has rescinded the reprimand of a Green Beret who led troops during the deadly October 2017 ambush in Niger that left four U.S. soldiers dead, the New York Times reported.

Last week, Team 3212 leader Capt. Michael Perozeni, initially blamed for his role in planning the mission, was formally cleared, the newspaper said.

Meanwhile, a more senior officer — Lt. Col. David Painter, then the battalion commander in charge of Alpha Company and Team 3212 — was issued a reprimand after initially escaping blame, according to the Dec. 7 report.

Col. Brad Moses, the commanding officer of 3rd Special Forces Group at the time, has so far received no punishment but is now under renewed scrutiny, the newspaper said.

U.S. Africa Command referred questions about punishments and accountability actions to U.S. Special Operations Command, which did not have an immediate response Monday.

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The latest moves came in response to a concern expressed by Defense Secretary Jim Mattis that lower-ranking troops were shouldering too much of the blame. After news reports highlighted that junior officers were being singled out for punishment, Mattis summoned top military commanders. The meeting resulted in Perozeni’s reprimand being rescinded and his supervisors being subjected to fresh scrutiny, the Times reported.

U.S. Special Operations Command Africa boss Maj. Gen. Marcus Hicks already had been reprimanded in connection with the ambush for insufficient oversight of his subordinate officers. He is the highest-ranking official punished so far for the incident.

An earlier Africa Command investigation of the October ambush determined that the members of the Green Beret and Nigerien team had little experience together as a unit.

In the aftermath of the attack, there has been significant inter-command friction between Army, SOCOM and AFRICOM as well as Pentagon leadership over who should be blamed, the Times reported.

While the Times cited complaints inside the Army about AFRICOM investigating itself, the command on Monday defended its investigation.

“It is not uncommon for a higher headquarters to serve as the investigating authority for one of its component or subordinate commands,” AFRICOM spokesman Maj. Karl Wiest said in an email. “U.S. AFRICOM had the responsibility to determine the facts and circumstances related to the attack in order to recognize the valor of our soldiers and to provide answers to the families of the fallen, Congress, and the American public.

“U.S. AFRICOM also needed this information to capture lessons that we have used to further refine our approach to countering violent extremists with our partners in the region.”

Four soldiers were killed in the ambush: Sgt. 1st Class Jeremiah W. Johnson, Staff Sgt. Bryan C. Black, Staff Sgt. Dustin M. Wright and Sgt. La David Johnson. Most of the 11 soldiers on the team, including the four slain troops, have been nominated for valor awards that have yet to be approved.

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Twitter: @john_vandiver


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Re: Actualité militaire au Niger

Message par malikos » 12 décembre 2018, 22:25

I like that approach. Effective to use dogs for finding snipers and other guys sneaking arround. Well done.


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Re: Actualité militaire au Niger

Message par malikos » 16 décembre 2018, 09:56

Indeed niger has many security issues. That many refugees and a powerless G5 alliance, with financial issues and a reliance on external partners rather than engaging in finding a just solution.

For most people next to Sozio/economical problems, injustice is the main cause of issues.
That last sentence applies to the whole of Africa.
52,000 displaced by violence in western Niger: UN
52,000 displaced by violence in western Niger: UN

Eric Oteng 21 hours ago
NIGER
More than 52,000 people have been displaced by violence since January in western Niger, an unstable area hit by jihadist incursions near the poor west African country’s border with Mali, the UN refugee agency said.

“The UN refugee agency is becoming increasingly troubled by ongoing violence in Niger’s border areas with Mali and Burkina Faso,” the UNHCR said in a statement.

“Those displaced report fleeing horrific violence. Armed groups are said to be attacking villages, killing and abducting civilians, including community leaders, burning schools and looting homes, businesses and livestock.”

The UN refugee agency is becoming increasingly troubled by ongoing violence in Niger's border areas with Mali and Burkina Faso.


TODAY

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UN: More than 52 000 displaced by ‘horrific violence’ in Niger https://ese.ng/hsNtI9 ..

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UN: More than 52 000 displaced by 'horrific violence' in Niger | TODAY.NG
More than 52 000 people have been displaced by violence since January in western Niger, an unstable area hit by jihadist incursions near the poor west African country's border with Mali, the UN...

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The raids and plunder affect residents of the Tahoua and Tillaberi border regions, where the government has declared a state of emergency while troops of a five-nation G5-Sahel military task force fights insurgents.

“They kidnapped five people from my village who were later found dead,” cattle farmer Al-Bashir Gamo Gamo told the UN agency, saying that armed groups threatened the villagers with death if they did not leave within 12 hours.

“Nobody can sleep at night, walk anywhere or cultivate crops because of fear,” he added.

He fled to the town of Inates, concerned about how to feed his family. “If you want to look after your animals, you have to go to the bush, but there, they can attack you.”


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Violence displaces more than 50,000 in western Niger this year -UNHCR https://kmaupdates.com/violence-displac ... ear-unhcr/ ….

10:08 AM - Dec 14, 2018
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The constant threats in an “alarming and extremely volatile” situation have prevented humanitarian workers from reaching some of the communities in need, the UNHCR said.

In addition to inducing local residents to flee, the violence is affecting 53,000 refugees from Mali who live in Niger’s border regions.

A previous count by the United Nations in October reported 42,000 people displaced by the activities of non-state armed groups and also by security measures aimed at halting “repeated infiltrations by terrorists” from Mali.

In January, only 540 internally displaced people were registered in west Niger. Humanitarian corridors were negotiated in July and October with the G5-Sahel force — Mali, Niger, Burkina Faso, Mauritania and Chad — and with Niger’s army.

The UN World Food Programme and a range of NGOs were then able to deliver food and other essential supplies to several thousand refugees in the “red zone”.


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#Violence displaces more than 50,000 in western #Niger this year: https://buff.ly/2UEwUrH via @refugees

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Violence displaces more than 50,000 in western Niger this year
UNHCR, the UN Refugee Agency is becoming increasingly troubled by ongoing violence in Niger’s border areas with Mali and Burkina Faso, which has forced

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On Wednesday Niger’s parliament extended the border area’s state of emergency, first put into place in March 2017.

Across the country, more than 156,000 people have displaced, while there are more than 175,000 refugees, according to the UNHCR.

Though the frontier is porous, Niger is regarded as one of the most stable countries in a vast area south of the Sahara where jihadist forces have emerged.


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Re: Actualité militaire au Niger

Message par malikos » 18 décembre 2018, 21:30

Au Niger, des drones américains seront à un jet de missile de la Libye
Philippe Chapleau-17-12-2018-Ouest France



Alors que John Bolton, le conseiller à la sécurité nationale de Donald Trump, détaillait la nouvelle posture américaine en Afrique et qu’il annonçait une aide beaucoup plus sélective tant aux États qu’aux organisations internationales qui y travaillent, les forces américaines poursuivaient, dans le Nord du Niger, les travaux d’aménagement d’une base de drones, à Agadez.

La guerre contre le terrorisme se joue aussi en Afrique. Français et Américains y œuvrent conjointement, en particulier en terme de surveillance aérienne. Les drones Reaper des deux armées de l’air jouent un rôle crucial dans la traque et la destruction des groupes armés terroristes.Un des Reaper de Niamey. Le gouvernement nigérien a donné son feu vert à un déploiement de drones armés jusqu'en 2024.

Un des Reaper de Niamey. Le gouvernement nigérien a donné son feu vert à un déploiement de drones armés jusqu’en 2024. | USAF
Les drones armés américains opèrent toujours de la base aérienne de Niamey (Niger). Mais dans six mois, les Reaper de l’US Air Force devraient être déployés plus au nord, à Agadez. La base aérienne 201 est en effet en travaux depuis 2016. Les Américains l’agrandissent et y installent leurs propres infrastructures opérationnelles et logistiques.

Rien de clandestin en tout cas : le chantier était annoncé dans les documents comptables du Pentagone dès 2014 et les appels d’offres étaient publics. Agadez n’a jamais été une base secrète, et même les militaires US se sont moqués de cette réputation. Le « secret le mieux gardé du Niger » n’en a jamais été un, quoi qu’en aient dit les complotistes de tous crins.

« Le secret le mieux gardé du Niger », ironise ce panneau. | USAF

Régulièrement, les services de communication de l’armée de l’air US ont mis en ligne des photos prises lors des différentes phases du chantier. Les plus récentes, réalisées le 12 décembre, montre un maître-chien du 824th Expeditionary Base Defense Squadron, en patrouille avec son chien. D’autres clichés détaillent l’avancement des travaux dans ce que va devenir la 2e grande base américaine du continent, après Djibouti.

Trois grands hangars ont été érigés mais des dizaines d'autres structures ont été construites pour les opérations, le stockage, le logement, la restauration etc.Trois grands hangars ont été érigés mais des dizaines d’autres structures ont été construites pour les opérations, le stockage, le logement, la restauration etc. | USAF

Pourquoi Agadez ?
Niamey est situé tout au sud-ouest du pays, entre le sud du Mali, l’est du Burkina et le Nigeria. Une position idéale pour intervenir dans ces zones où la pression des djihadistes est forte.

Agadez, à 900 km au nord-est de la capitale, est beaucoup plus central, plus proche du Tchad et du nord-est du Nigeria, à mi-chemin entre Niamey et la Libye et à portée des zones de transit des terroristes et des trafiquants entre Mali et Libye, au sud de l’Algérie.

Cette future base devra pouvoir accueillir un avion gros-porteur de type C-17 et d’autres avions de transport comme le C-130 de la vidéo ci-dessus, des avions ISR (Intelligence, surveillance, reconnaissance) et des drones armés. Selon le projet détaillé en 2015, elle devait être équipée de trois grandes structures de toile pour abriter des aéronefs, d’un taxiway et de parkings, de 8 tours de garde etc. 65 millions de dollars avaient alors été budgétés pour ce chantier.

Les sapeurs du RED HORSE, le Rapid Engineer Deployable Heavy Operational Repair Squadron, ont travaillé pendant six mois à la rénovation des pistes et à la construction de parkings.Les sapeurs du RED HORSE, le Rapid Engineer Deployable Heavy Operational Repair Squadron, ont travaillé pendant six mois à la rénovation des pistes et à la construction de parkings. | USAF

Trois ans plus tard, les travaux sont toujours en cours. Des appels d’offres ont été récemment diffusés, ce qui montre que certains chantiers ne sont pas encore lancés ou que la réalisation de certaines prestations n’a pas encore été attribuée à des sous-traitants.

Selon un porte-parole du commandement Afrique (l’AFRICOM) la base aérienne d’Agadez ne sera pas opérationnelle avant le milieu de l’année 2019. Le porte-parole a cité « les conditions climatiques (saison des pluies) » et des « complexités environnementales » pour expliquer ce « retard minime » dans l’achèvement des travaux sur la piste et les infrastructures.

Le futur mess va remplacer les tentes qui servent encore pour la restauration.Le futur mess va remplacer les tentes qui servent encore pour la restauration. | USAF

Actuellement, le génie américain construit le futur mess en dur. En novembre, les sapeurs US ont coulé 65 tonnes de béton pour couler la dalle qui va soutenir la structure de ce bâtiment de 1 200 m2.

Les travaux se poursuivent aussi sur les zones de stockage qui devront accueillir carburants et munitions.

L’enveloppe initiale de 65 millions de dollars est désormais largement multipliée par 2. Selon l’US Air Force, la note devrait s’élever, jusqu’en 2024, à un total de 280 millions de dollars.

https://www.ouest-france.fr/terrorisme/ ... ye-6134991


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malikos
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Re: Actualité militaire au Niger

Message par malikos » 18 décembre 2018, 21:54



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Re: Actualité militaire au Niger

Message par malikos » 18 décembre 2018, 22:02

U.S. Air Force explosive ordnance disposal technicians hold a knowledge exchange for Nigerien partners on Nigerien Air Base 201, Niger. The knowledge shared will help Nigerien partners combat extremist organizations to bring peace and stability to the region.


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Re: Actualité militaire au Niger

Message par malikos » 19 décembre 2018, 05:45

Passe de Salvador : un mort, un blessé et un porté disparu après une attaque
18 décembre 2018 DIM Actualités 0


Vue aérienne du fort de Madama, novembre 2014 - Photo : D.R
Nous apprenons de source digne de foi que le samedi dernier un véhicule présumé appartenir à des trafiquants de drogue a été détruit aux environs de la passe dite de Salvador, non loin de la frontière nigéro-libyenne.
Sur place, une personne a été tuée et une autre griévement blessée. Ayant été informés juste après l’attaque par le survivant, des proches à eux les ont localisé. Ils ont enterré le mort sur place et ramené le blessé admis d’urgence à l’hôpital d’Arlit.
La Rédaction de Aïr Info a aussi appris qu’un troisième occupant du véhicule est porté disparu.

L’ identité de ceux qui ont attaqué le véhicule prête à confusion. Si les proches du blessé parlent d’une attaque menée par des militaires étrangers occidentaux présents aux alentours de la passe de Salvador, d’autres sources citent des combattants d’origine tchadienne à l’origine de l’attaque. Pour l’instant, les sources sécuritaires contactées par Aïr Info n’ont ni infirmé ni confirmé l’information.

La Rédaction
https://airinfoagadez.com/2018/12/18/pa ... e-attaque/

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